@#$%ing insane marketing
that grows revenue bigly.

How I'll send your sales to the moon.

Conversion breakthroughs.

Sales friction elimination.

Agile marketing.

Contact me.

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17311 Drey Lane
Huntington Beach, CA, USA 92677

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I've Hit a ROAS as high as 1,068% and I've also...

... spent the last 10 years building highly-successful marketing strategies for over 50 different companies. I've worked at small businesses, startups, digital marketing agencies, ad networks, & a few large global companies. I've even helped one startup company scale from $0 to $150 million in revenue in 3 years with no outside funding. That's because I obsess over results. I also have 17 certifications in marketing, copywriting, web development, media buying, and sales, as well as a Bachelors of Science in Marketing from Cal State University, Long Beach.

If you have good products or services that aren't selling (or you can't seem to scale), schedule a 30-minute chat with me.

Easy daily reports.

All the technical junk.

Marketing compliance.

Starting is easy.

1) Chat.
Click "Let's chat" on the navigation and pick a time.
 
2) Wait.
After we talk, I'll take a few days to create a plan.
 
3) Go.
If you like the plan, I'll start growing your business.
 

Get a One-Page Website Built To Get Leads and Sales

What I do

I will actively optimize conversion rates using 10 years of experience and new data-backed insights.

You need full transparency. Every single day you'll get a simple text update of everything done that day.

I'll find and remove roadblocks in your sales and marketing processes at every step in the funnel.

I'll pivot strategies, tactics, channels, and messaging to get the highest ROI possible.

Whether you need instant email alerts, integrations, css, python, or custom tracking passed, I've got you.

Entities like GDPR, CCPA, ADA, FTC are strict and complicated. I'll help reduce these compliance risks.

"It's as simple as this. Troy develops and manages a marketing strategy that just plain works! From day 1 my company started seeing his marketing plan paying dividends. On top of that, Troy was an absolute pleasure to work with. From start to finish everything in our project went smooth and as planned. Speaking of his plan, it was detailed and professional. He developed a marketing funnel that is working wonders for my company and he really directed what was said perfectly to my customer. Any time there was a change needed or something tweaked, he was on top of it and nothing ever slipped through the cracks. I personally recommend Troy 100% and couldn't be happier with how everything worked out. I will definitely be using him again in the future for other projects!"

★ ★ ★ ★ ★

The High-Level Details of My 
Lead Generation Marketing Services

The Easy, Affordable Service That Creates New Happy Customers

How I'll send your sales to the moon.

Agile marketing.

I've Hit a ROAS as high as 1,068% and I've also...

@#$%ing insane marketing
that grows revenue bigly.

Disclaimer: I can not and do not make any guarantees about your ability to get results, sales, or data, or earn any money with our products, services, ideas, information, tools, or strategies. You should know that all content by this company is for educational, demonstrative, and informational purposes only and all products or services by this company are a "best effort" attempt at performance. There are no guarantees of any kind. Nothing on this page, any of our websites, or any of our content, products, services, byproducts thereof, or anything else is a promise or guarantee of results or future earnings, and we do not offer any legal, medical, tax, business, sales, or other professional advice. Any financial numbers referenced here, or on any of our sites, are illustrative of concepts only and should not be considered average earnings, exact earnings, or promises for actual or future performance. Use caution and always consult your accountant, lawyer or professional advisor before acting on this or any information related to a lifestyle change or your business or finances. You alone are responsible and accountable for your decisions, actions and results in life, and by your registration here you agree not to attempt to hold us liable for your decisions, actions or results, at any time, under any circumstance.

Pick a time.

If you're interested in seeing if I'm a good match for your business growth goals, let's chat.

Really good $#!% you've never heard.

Don't want to hire me? At least enjoy my memes.

"Troy developed a marketing funnel that is working wonders."

Let's chat.

Here's 25 of 93,594 things I've learned from experience.

I’ve done marketing for everything. I'm talking about roof repair, lawyer tools, specialized hardware, food, custom skis, architectural design, smartphone apps, research, gold IRA’s, broadcasting equipment, cat toys, SaaS, CBD oil, christian leadership groups, charities, media publications, artist courses, trading education, trade show events, auditing services, and basically everything...


1) Skip “failing fast” andsteal intuition.

You don’t need to “fail fast” for 30 years to naturally accumulate useful marketing experience. You can quickly build great marketing intuition by observing the results of 100’s of marketing tests. If you google “conversion rate optimization case studies” you’ll find endless marketing tests. Read as many of these as you can until your eyes bleed. You’ll instantly get better at driving sales.


2) You don’t need a blog just “because”.

“Well you gotta have a blog!” No, you don’t. Thousands of companies manage to grow without a blog. According to Marketing Profs, there’s over 2 million blog posts posted daily on average. If you want to compete in the blog-o-sphere, you’ve got to have a better reason than “because”. If you want to create content, go low on quantity and high on quality.


3) Be careful on proprietary martech platforms

.

Yellow is a terrible color for text on a white background, but that's not the big point here. People don’t want to 17 different tools for their marketing, so they turn instead turn to "do-it-all platforms" like Keap and Hubspot. However, once your data is in those proprietary platforms, switching off of them gets tedious, they leave you subject to price increases and locked data.


4) The "fluffy side" of marketing can be powerful

.

At the end of each month, you need ROI, not "pizzazz". Design is often on the chopping block. The truth is, a picture "can" be worth 1,000 words... but what if those 1,000 words were garbage? There is a big difference in impact between awful stock images and the high-quality, value-conveying type of imagery you might find on Netflix's homepage background unless they've changed it recently. 


5) The 7 deadly sins can help you sell

.

The 7 deadly sins are as follows: Greed (material wealth or gain), gluttony (wanting more than needed), lust (craving pleasure), envy (desiring another’s status), pride (self-glorifying), sloth (lazy, don’t want to work), and wrath (unleashing anger). We hard-wired to enjoy these things. Other powerful marketing emotions include include fear and great joy.


6) Stay malleable with brand, media, & more.

If you're sued over your branding, lose your domain name, or your main paid media source skyrockets in cost, can you easily adapt? Is the logo and name on every page of everything? What if Google starts to favor AMP significantly more than HTML... Do you have 10,000 pages to move individually or can you quickly pivot and capitalize on the benefits?


7) If content is king, then demo Is overlord

.

Content marketing preps your leads, but demo's can auto-close big deals... When you were offered a test drive by that car dealership or you got that 14-day trial for that SaaS company, (and if the product was good), it sold the product with direct experience instead of "selling". How many $45,000 cars or $20,000 SaaS products have you bought just because of the "content"


8) "Best practices" are training wheels at best.

While applying generic best practices perfectly to a specific business well get better results than shooting from the hip, it will not get you hokey-stick growth. Go to growthhackers.com and read their growth studies. You'll find all 16 ignored generic advice, and often found just one specific channel, offer, and strategy to find insane growth, pivoting as necessary.


9) Look at your funnel like you look at others.

Your marketing looks good because it's yours. You'll never see (of fix) the problems until you do this... Pretend you are an extremely skeptical prospectReally picture that person, and BECOME them. Suddenly you won't believe your snappy copy. Do you think the competition has a better product or a better deal? What do you REALLY think of the ads, content, website, service, and products?



10) Dominate an ultra-lean business model.

Here's an example I love. The entirety of a growing startup called Morning Brew is a daily email with short-format news aimed at millennials.  Their money is made from ads in that newsletter. That's it. No major worries about SEO, social media presence, paid ad management, product management, technical issues, refunds, testimonials, etc. It's just... simple.



11) Play It stress-free with less products.

You know why In-N-Out can crank out quality food at the speed of light? They only have 3 products. It also allows their operation to run smoothly, never have a hiccup, and reduce stress of their employees.



12) A simple-as-dirt website can be enough.

The "website" has been dead for a decade. Entire businesses now run their entire sales funnel without touching the site by leveraging apps and social/shopping channels. What's left instead on their domain is a simple squeeze page and a thank you popup... sometimes with an up-sell. That’s it. No wasted time building out a full website on WordPress or html/css.



13) Don't create a huge whiteboard funnel diagram.

As mentioned above, the website is just a squeeze page and a thank you. Guess how much you can save by not paying a full team of digital marketers to constantly churn out new campaigns and optimize all of the funnels? A lot. Every company is doing this. You won't stand out. You'll blend in. Guess how saturated the whiteboard marketing funnel strategy is in your industry in 2021. Very.



14) Spend 95% of your time perfecting one landing page.

If you've crafted a winning offer, then you should have one squeeze page to focus most of your conversion rate optimization efforts on, and that page will convert as high as 60% - 80% from icy traffic.

The page must have all of the major elements dialed:

- A killer, lights-out marketing hook
- One simple, benefit-oriented headline
- Great hero shots showcasing value
- Value-packed bullet lists
- Proven high-conversion template
- No unnecessary navigation
- A clean and provoking CTA
- Powerful testimonials
- No “urgency” (Millennials and Zoomers hate this $#!%)



15) Always continue with leftover attention.

After opting in or buying, many companies just send leads to their end destination. However, it's often best to harness the attention of the new leads to either up-sell or incentivize a referral. It's usually the lowest-hanging fruit in terms of optimization.


16) A standard buyer persona is absolute trash.

The highest-impact marketers follow the same rule on buyer personas or avatars. They focus on painting. a full short story around their ideal target buyer, instead of a list of their demographics and psychographics. Literally write a 10 page story about prospect X, and everything little detail they experience in their day, incorporating facts and data where possible. By doing this, you'll be forced to walk in their shoes, and make a message that's hyper-relatable and breaks through the noise.



17) Speak to a crystal-clear desired end result.

Going back to my Morning Brew example...

Headline: “Become Smarter in Just 5 Minutes.”
Sub-head: “Join us and start your day with the latest news from Wall St. to Silicon Valley.”

There’s no way to misinterpret the value to be gained by joining their newsletter. If you want to be smart and “in the know” about key business happenings, you’ll join.

Their single displayed testimonial is also worth highlighting here:

“For the first time, I read news about business and didn’t fall into an unconscious daydream.”

It showcases the non-dull, won’t bore you with numbers angle of their newsletter. Not to mention, their hero shot is of a newsletter on an iPhone, and the newsletter illustrates that same tone.



18) You need top-quality creative writing, nothing less.

Standard content used to be 500 words and provided almost no value. Now, standard content is 2000 words, with rich imagery, provides a fair amount of value... but it is tasteless and boring. He'll, even AI is writing some portion of content now. 

You need writing that is timely, fact-based, packed with value, no fluff, entertaining, and some other element to stand out. You want your readers to feel like they are watching The Mandalorian, not a dry blog article about "how to do X."



19) Balance cut-throat direct-response with brand.

There are two big "schools" of marketing. Brand marketing is more traditional. It's concerned with image, appearance, market position, feelings... Thing is, brands are everywhere, ads are many... Direct response marketing is strictly ROI focused. Direct response style copywriting and design has also flooded your market. To truly stand out AND move prospects through a funnel, a balance of both will help you carve out marketing-style niche that others are neglecting.



20) Consider opening attention loops occasionally.

Some companies maintain a 45%+ open rate on their email list (although this is subject to how clean you keep it). You don't want to use clickbait for subject lines, but you can ride the line on it. You probably know how effective it is to bait the open, but you know your audience would turn on you if you used straight clickbait. The middle ground is a bait and switch subject line, in which they peak your curiosity, get you to open the email, then lead with something else. Always make a point to answer what was addressed in the subject line, but it comes later, typically buried, in the email.



21) Format disruption is a magical attention-getting tool.

In most email provider GUI’s, email senders have an icon or profile image that populates next to their name. In most cases, the image is cropped in the shape of a circle. When someone sends you an email, with a vibrant unique-shaped icon (in the shape of a triangle, coffee mug, or whatever else) with a transparent background, it looks pretty prominent against all the other dull, similar circle shapes. This is just one very tiny example of format disruption, but it can be used in multiple ways on many mediums. It's also what separates winning ads from losing ads, even if the ad is "perfect".



22) "Frequency-train" your email list.

Sending an email every single or every other business day (and some weekend days) without fail does something more than just provide you with the opportunity to pump up sales… It is a known fact in email marketing that if you establish a strong cadence from the start with your emails, customers will, more or less, expect your content at that strong frequency and be less irritated than had you suddenly ramped up. 300 emails sent vs. 30 emails sent is going to win in every case (as long as you don't drop your content quality to increase the frequency).



23) Chop your content into chunks, please.

God forbid I say your content should be snack-able... Worst marketing jargon ever devised. If one section bores you, it’s easy to move to the next. Each section is also prominently labeled so it’s easy to find which sections interest you the most.



24) Incentivizing the referral is a big growth lever.

You can incentivize to refer other leads after opting in, or after buying. Oh, and at the end of every email. This gives you dozens or hundreds of opportunities to get referrals out of your existing subscribers. You can incentive in at least four different ways:

- Plain old asking based on a great customer experience (great things get referrals)
- High-quality free content offers (your leads very naturally gives other new leads something cool)
- Single-side financial incentives for referring (the referrer get's a spiff)
- Double-side financial incentives for referring  (the referrer and referree both get a spiff)



25) Develop a culture of statuses.

Your progress as a customer can be tracked. You can assign status symbols very easily by creating levels such as Bronze, Sliver, Gold, and Platinum (please be more creative than those names) for how much customers consume and even give special breaks or gifts for their loyalty. The same can also be done if a referral program is tracked. Even better, the progress is shown in each email with a dynamic meter. This simple tactic gives off a feeling of status. Are you a die hard member, or are you a newb? This promotes sharing even more so than standalone incentives.


Here's 25 of 93,594 things I've learned from experience.

I’ve done marketing for everything. I'm talking about roof repair, lawyer tools, specialized hardware, food, custom skis, architectural design, smartphone apps, research, gold IRA’s, broadcasting equipment, cat toys, SaaS, CBD oil, christian leadership groups, charities, media publications, artist courses, trading education, trade show events, auditing services, and basically everything...


1) Skip “failing fast” andsteal intuition.

You don’t need to “fail fast” for 30 years to naturally accumulate useful marketing experience. You can quickly build great marketing intuition by observing the results of 100’s of marketing tests. If you google “conversion rate optimization case studies” you’ll find endless marketing tests. Read as many of these as you can until your eyes bleed. You’ll instantly get better at driving sales.


2) You don’t need a blog just “because”.

“Well you gotta have a blog!” No, you don’t. Thousands of companies manage to grow without a blog. According to Marketing Profs, there’s over 2 million blog posts posted daily on average. If you want to compete in the blog-o-sphere, you’ve got to have a better reason than “because”. If you want to create content, go low on quantity and high on quality.


3) Be careful on proprietary martech platforms

.

Yellow is a terrible color for text on a white background, but that's not the big point here. People don’t want to 17 different tools for their marketing, so they turn instead turn to "do-it-all platforms" like Keap and Hubspot. However, once your data is in those proprietary platforms, switching off of them gets tedious, they leave you subject to price increases and locked data.


4) The "fluffy side" of marketing can be powerful

.

At the end of each month, you need ROI, not "pizzazz". Design is often on the chopping block. The truth is, a picture "can" be worth 1,000 words... but what if those 1,000 words were garbage? There is a big difference in impact between awful stock images and the high-quality, value-conveying type of imagery you might find on Netflix's homepage background unless they've changed it recently. 


5) The 7 deadly sins can help you sell

.

The 7 deadly sins are as follows: Greed (material wealth or gain), gluttony (wanting more than needed), lust (craving pleasure), envy (desiring another’s status), pride (self-glorifying), sloth (lazy, don’t want to work), and wrath (unleashing anger). We hard-wired to enjoy these things. Other powerful marketing emotions include include fear and great joy.


6) Stay malleable with brand, media, & more.

If you're sued over your branding, lose your domain name, or your main paid media source skyrockets in cost, can you easily adapt? Is the logo and name on every page of everything? What if Google starts to favor AMP significantly more than HTML... Do you have 10,000 pages to move individually or can you quickly pivot and capitalize on the benefits?


7) If content is king, then demo Is overlord

.

Content marketing preps your leads, but demo's can auto-close big deals... When you were offered a test drive by that car dealership or you got that 14-day trial for that SaaS company, (and if the product was good), it sold the product with direct experience instead of "selling". How many $45,000 cars or $20,000 SaaS products have you bought just because of the "content"


8) "Best practices" are training wheels at best.

While applying generic best practices perfectly to a specific business well get better results than shooting from the hip, it will not get you hokey-stick growth. Go to growthhackers.com and read their growth studies. You'll find all 16 ignored generic advice, and often found just one specific channel, offer, and strategy to find insane growth, pivoting as necessary.


9) Look at your funnel like you look at others.

Your marketing looks good because it's yours. You'll never see (of fix) the problems until you do this... Pretend you are an extremely skeptical prospectReally picture that person, and BECOME them. Suddenly you won't believe your snappy copy. Do you think the competition has a better product or a better deal? What do you REALLY think of the ads, content, website, service, and products?



10) Dominate an ultra-lean business model.

Here's an example I love. The entirety of a growing startup called Morning Brew is a daily email with short-format news aimed at millennials.  Their money is made from ads in that newsletter. That's it. No major worries about SEO, social media presence, paid ad management, product management, technical issues, refunds, testimonials, etc. It's just... simple.



11) Play It stress-free with less products.

You know why In-N-Out can crank out quality food at the speed of light? They only have 3 products. It also allows their operation to run smoothly, never have a hiccup, and reduce stress of their employees.



12) A simple-as-dirt website can be enough.

The "website" has been dead for a decade. Entire businesses now run their entire sales funnel without touching the site by leveraging apps and social/shopping channels. What's left instead on their domain is a simple squeeze page and a thank you popup... sometimes with an up-sell. That’s it. No wasted time building out a full website on WordPress or html/css.



13) Don't create a huge whiteboard funnel diagram.

As mentioned above, the website is just a squeeze page and a thank you. Guess how much you can save by not paying a full team of digital marketers to constantly churn out new campaigns and optimize all of the funnels? A lot. Every company is doing this. You won't stand out. You'll blend in. Guess how saturated the whiteboard marketing funnel strategy is in your industry in 2021. Very.



14) Spend 95% of your time perfecting one landing page.

If you've crafted a winning offer, then you should have one squeeze page to focus most of your conversion rate optimization efforts on, and that page will convert as high as 60% - 80% from icy traffic.

The page must have all of the major elements dialed:

- A killer, lights-out marketing hook
- One simple, benefit-oriented headline
- Great hero shots showcasing value
- Value-packed bullet lists
- Proven high-conversion template
- No unnecessary navigation
- A clean and provoking CTA
- Powerful testimonials
- No “urgency” (Millennials and Zoomers hate this $#!%)



15) Always continue with leftover attention.

After opting in or buying, many companies just send leads to their end destination. However, it's often best to harness the attention of the new leads to either up-sell or incentivize a referral. It's usually the lowest-hanging fruit in terms of optimization.


16) A standard buyer persona is absolute trash.

The highest-impact marketers follow the same rule on buyer personas or avatars. They focus on painting. a full short story around their ideal target buyer, instead of a list of their demographics and psychographics. Literally write a 10 page story about prospect X, and everything little detail they experience in their day, incorporating facts and data where possible. By doing this, you'll be forced to walk in their shoes, and make a message that's hyper-relatable and breaks through the noise.



17) Speak to a crystal-clear desired end result.

Going back to my Morning Brew example...

Headline: “Become Smarter in Just 5 Minutes.”
Sub-head: “Join us and start your day with the latest news from Wall St. to Silicon Valley.”

There’s no way to misinterpret the value to be gained by joining their newsletter. If you want to be smart and “in the know” about key business happenings, you’ll join.

Their single displayed testimonial is also worth highlighting here:

“For the first time, I read news about business and didn’t fall into an unconscious daydream.”

It showcases the non-dull, won’t bore you with numbers angle of their newsletter. Not to mention, their hero shot is of a newsletter on an iPhone, and the newsletter illustrates that same tone.



18) You need top-quality creative writing, nothing less.

Standard content used to be 500 words and provided almost no value. Now, standard content is 2000 words, with rich imagery, provides a fair amount of value... but it is tasteless and boring. He'll, even AI is writing some portion of content now. 

You need writing that is timely, fact-based, packed with value, no fluff, entertaining, and some other element to stand out. You want your readers to feel like they are watching The Mandalorian, not a dry blog article about "how to do X."



19) Balance cut-throat direct-response with brand.

There are two big "schools" of marketing. Brand marketing is more traditional. It's concerned with image, appearance, market position, feelings... Thing is, brands are everywhere, ads are many... Direct response marketing is strictly ROI focused. Direct response style copywriting and design has also flooded your market. To truly stand out AND move prospects through a funnel, a balance of both will help you carve out marketing-style niche that others are neglecting.



20) Consider opening attention loops occasionally.

Some companies maintain a 45%+ open rate on their email list (although this is subject to how clean you keep it). You don't want to use clickbait for subject lines, but you can ride the line on it. You probably know how effective it is to bait the open, but you know your audience would turn on you if you used straight clickbait. The middle ground is a bait and switch subject line, in which they peak your curiosity, get you to open the email, then lead with something else. Always make a point to answer what was addressed in the subject line, but it comes later, typically buried, in the email.



21) Format disruption is a magical attention-getting tool.

In most email provider GUI’s, email senders have an icon or profile image that populates next to their name. In most cases, the image is cropped in the shape of a circle. When someone sends you an email, with a vibrant unique-shaped icon (in the shape of a triangle, coffee mug, or whatever else) with a transparent background, it looks pretty prominent against all the other dull, similar circle shapes. This is just one very tiny example of format disruption, but it can be used in multiple ways on many mediums. It's also what separates winning ads from losing ads, even if the ad is "perfect".



22) "Frequency-train" your email list.

Sending an email every single or every other business day (and some weekend days) without fail does something more than just provide you with the opportunity to pump up sales… It is a known fact in email marketing that if you establish a strong cadence from the start with your emails, customers will, more or less, expect your content at that strong frequency and be less irritated than had you suddenly ramped up. 300 emails sent vs. 30 emails sent is going to win in every case (as long as you don't drop your content quality to increase the frequency).



23) Chop your content into chunks, please.

God forbid I say your content should be snack-able... Worst marketing jargon ever devised. If one section bores you, it’s easy to move to the next. Each section is also prominently labeled so it’s easy to find which sections interest you the most.



24) Incentivizing the referral is a big growth lever.

You can incentivize to refer other leads after opting in, or after buying. Oh, and at the end of every email. This gives you dozens or hundreds of opportunities to get referrals out of your existing subscribers. You can incentive in at least four different ways:

- Plain old asking based on a great customer experience (great things get referrals)
- High-quality free content offers (your leads very naturally gives other new leads something cool)
- Single-side financial incentives for referring (the referrer get's a spiff)
- Double-side financial incentives for referring  (the referrer and referree both get a spiff)



25) Develop a culture of statuses.

Your progress as a customer can be tracked. You can assign status symbols very easily by creating levels such as Bronze, Sliver, Gold, and Platinum (please be more creative than those names) for how much customers consume and even give special breaks or gifts for their loyalty. The same can also be done if a referral program is tracked. Even better, the progress is shown in each email with a dynamic meter. This simple tactic gives off a feeling of status. Are you a die hard member, or are you a newb? This promotes sharing even more so than standalone incentives.